Tours Machu Picchu and Huaynapicchu, the Sacred Plaza

Tours Machu Picchu and Huaynapicchu, the Sacred Plaza to visit the Inca city. Leaving the top and going in a southerly direction, several stone steps down and one approaches a flat terrace, which we call, for lack of a better name, the Holy Place, because both sides are temples bigger. Before reaching it is passed to the left against a very unique rock that has the approximate shape of a giant clam. Leading to the top are seven steps cut in a smooth granite disintegrated, and from the top you get a delightful view. Footwear stones have also been on top of the cliff to make a small platform which can keep three or four people and greet the rising sun of Machu Picchu and Huaynapicchu.

To the north of this rock and beneath it are the walls of a small house of about ten to fifteen feet in diameter constructed with the greatest expertise and the best Inca style; that is, with blocks of white granite and edged carefully chosen, many of them apparently rectangular. Some of the largest are notably polygonal, but all are built without cement. The row appears below consists of particularly long thin blocks, about four feet long and two meters high; the top rows are smaller, but all pretty symmetrical. To the left of the door as you enter is a single gigantic worked as constituting the lower and middle of the front wall complete block. Not only the lower parts of two of the niches that are planted this house are cut in stone, but also with some whimsical display of ingenuity and spirit of the game, the builders carved out of the corner of the room itself in this extraordinary block, so that even forms a very small part of one of the outer walls. In the palace of Inca Rocca in Cusco there is a stone that made famous the early Spanish writers because it presents fourteen angles of Machu Picchu and Huaynapicchu. Visitors always contemplated. This has thirty-two!

The small building has another unusual feature: a long stone bench or sofa covering the entire length of the house on the opposite side to the Inca door. It is made of beautifully cut blocks.

This house is adjacent to the main temple, which has already been described. When I first saw her I would be inclined to believe that the mansion of the high priest, but later studies led me to suppose that it was rather a royal mausoleum and the seat or sofa was destined to the mummies of the Inca emperors. We can be certain that no sacrifice was spared to make this little gem structure an entire masonry. The building is covered by niches so identical that the eye can just point any difference in shape or size. In selecting the blocks in the finish, in the proportions of the room and in the artistic care with which it was built, up to the perfect. Other old buildings can match her beauty, but none exceeded. It offers abundant proof that here on trips to Machu Picchu was one of the most beautiful shrines built by the Incas or some other prehistoric American people!

The Temple of the Sun in Cuzco, in addition to the altar and acce¬sorios, has the mummies of the dead Inca emperors of the dynasty. According to Juan de Betanzos, who lived in Cusco in 1550, inme¬diatamente after the conquest of Peru, the mummies were sitting on wooden benches carved beautifully. He says the Inca Pachacutec ordered there in the presence of the image of the sun, the dead emperors, but also “built a number of packages, as many as have been the lords who succeeded Manco Capac down to his father, the Inca Viracocha “.

It seems possible that some of the mummies represented in the Sun Temple in Cuzco by “packages” may have been actually preserved Inca city of Machu Picchu and Huaynapicchu.

The high priest was usually an uncle or a brother of the reigning emperor. Under him there were two kinds of priests who celebrated the solemn rites, always being Incas blood, and officiating in the less important ceremonies and were Incas by privilege, ie members of the families of powerful nobles who the king wanted to honor.

Significantly, this little gem of the building is at the foot of a staircase leading up to the intihuatana and finally is adjacent to the main temple of Machu Picchu. The state religion of the Incas, who worshiped the sun, is linked to the destiny and the administration of the Inca Empire in the closest intimacy.

Sun priests were naturally the most favored, and it is not surprising to discover that the beautiful stone stairs leading to intihuatana are the most carefully constructed among all of Machu Picchu. The steps are about four feet wide, but each is made from a single block of granite. There is a low parapet on each side of the ladder. North of the royal mausoleum or the house of the high priest are at Inca trail and a balustrade overlooking the beautiful Sacred Valley of the Incas and the river two thousand feet down. Built in the “house of the priest,” and evidently built at the same time-and one of the lowest part of both stones buildings-, stands the main temple, which took my breath away when I first saw that unique building Inca empire.

All the walls of this seems to have given about a foot, taking part of the north wall. No wonder that it happened so, because the walls seem to have only a weak foundation. However, as it was perfectly embedded in Machu Picchu, which has evolved as a mass without damaging the settlement of Inca stones, except in the corner.

Perhaps the most marked feature of this temple is that extre¬mos side of East and West are not perpendicular or have the inclination inwards, characteristic of almost all the ancient Peruvian structures. Actually, they form an obtuse angle. The lower half of said angle is in each case the edge of a single cyclopean block the bottom row of the strict walls sloping inward get to the bottom. The top angle is formed by the remaining six rows and bends to the inside top. Angle point contains a cut in the block ciclópeo lower row, obviously planned to allow the introduction of a long wooden beam hole, probably stretched across the open front to the point angle at the front end opposite.

My first impression was that this trunk might have served to support the roof of the structure; but the perfect finish gives the top row leads me to believe that this building was never roofed, but those holes support the ends of a log which in turn holds a swing or curtain of the finest antique fabric, woven discover strange super¬ that beautiful Inca stone stairs leading to intihuatana are the most carefully constructed among all of Machu Picchu and Huaynapicchu. The steps are about four feet wide, but each is made from a single block of granite. There is a low parapet on either side of this Inca stairway. North of the royal mausoleum or the house of the high priest running a road and a balustrade overlooking the beautiful valley and the river sacred to two thousand feet down. Built in the “house of the priest,” and evidently built at the same time-and one of the lowest part of both stones buildings-, stands the main temple, which took my breath away when I first saw that unique building .

All the walls of this seems to have given about a foot, taking part of the north wall No wonder it happened so, because the walls seem to have only a weak foundation. However, he was so perfectly built, which has broken away as a mass without damaging the arrangement of stones, except in the corner.

Perhaps the most marked feature of this temple is that extre¬mos side of East and West are not perpendicular or have the inclination inwards, characteristic of almost all the ancient Peruvian structures. Actually, they form an obtuse angle. The lower half of said angle is in each case the edge of a single cyclopean block the bottom row of the strict walls sloping inward get to the bottom. The top angle is formed by the remaining six rows and bends to the inside top. Angle point contains a cut in the block ciclópeo lower row, obviously planned to allow the introduction of a long wooden beam hole, probably stretched across the open front to the point angle at the front end opposite.

My first impression was that this trunk might have served to support the roof of the structure; but the perfect finish gives the top row leads me to believe that this building was never roofed, but those holes support the ends of a log which in turn holds a relatively beautiful swing or curtain of the finest antique fabric, fabric super¬ of Machu Picchu and Huaynapicchu. You could remove when it was not helpful. Such inventive allow inside the temple would find constantly exposed to the sun, while at the same time he was separated from the view of anyone from the Inca Sacred Plaza. If this is the place where the mummies of dead ancestors purposes of worship were brought, the presence of a roof would be undesirable and would disrupt the ceremony of giving mums a comfortable sunbath.

No sacrifices were omitted to make this unique structure under all the best and most robust architecture of the Incas. Its builders had a remarkable concept of symmetry. They twinned niche niche and almost block by block. No other building in Peru gives a finer print of high artistic and architectural status achieved by the ancient people of the Andes. While there is nowhere carved temple, the sides of the larger cyclopean block were cut in way to offer the pleasing effect of three rows of stones that offered more or less the lines of the regular rows of blocks. The large stone altar at the back had two salient poles at the base. They are not equal nor are symmetrically placed and projections can be just left to help builders in the location of the large block in the right places, which must weigh at least ten tons.

On the western side of the square stands a semicircular bastion of about ten feet in diameter and eight high. Dominates the Urubamba Valley (Sacred Valley of the Incas) and is the highest of a succession of beautiful terraces that extend down to the edge of the cliffs. The bastion has done in large granite blocks cut to form an almost perfect semicircle. This remarkable stone cutting is further evidence of the big age reached by the Inca civilization. The architects tell me that such skill in building a graceful circular tower is not achieved easily or early in the history of the Inca art.

In the south side of the square is a large rectangular building of typical Inca construction later, made of small stones placed roughly finished as adobe, with two doors and no windows. Its interior walls are lined with symmetrically located niches; total; It is a residence of obviously important, but it has required only a few weeks or months to build it. It is quite possible that it was built after the flight of Manco Cusco, when this old sanctuary had to be enlarged to welcome the priests and other servants of the last Inca and Chosen Women who sought refuge here in the days of Pizarro.

At the opposite end of the square, the East, are the ruins of the most significant building of all, the Temple of the Three Windows of the Inca city of Machu Picchu.

Its walls, like those of the main temple, only cover three sides and the fourth is open to the Sacred Plaza, with the sole exception that a single monolithic pillar for supporting the roof of the building dossier is not in any other estruc¬ ture of the city. The building had a roof ridge, whose stones in the end were larger than usual, but, nevertheless, put on clay instead of each other roads. As in the main temple, cyclopean blocks were used in the bottom row, and the terms of the side walls forming obtuse angles instead of being perpendicular. Also the point of the angle contains a planned cavity, no doubt to allow the admission of the end of the roof. The top of the monolithic pillar, positioned midway between the two chambers, had notches.

In order to build this structure the architect was forced to make a foundation for the eastern wall leading down to the level of the next terrace. For this he used four large stones and built a wall eleven feet from the terrace rises to the level of a window lintel. The lintel of each window is part of a Cyclopean polygonal block. Inca temple walls are of blocks, some of them quite irregular, but all white granite choice and beautifully worked. This granite may have been extracted from a quarry in the immediate vicinity.

Tours Machu Picchu and Huaynapicchu, the Sacred Plaza
Posted in Tours Machupicchu